All posts by Mareike@WCRP/SPARC

SPARC Science update: 11 December – 17 December

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

 

A 17 year climatology of the macrophysical properties of convection in Darwin. By R.C. Jackson et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

A Multivariate Probabilistic Framework for Tracking the Intertropical Convergence Zone: Analysis of Recent Climatology and Past Trends. By A. Mamalakis and E. Foufoula‐Georgiou in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Quantifying the irreducible uncertainty in near‐term climate projections. By J. Marotzke in WIREs Climate Change.

Estimating daily climatological normals in a changing climate. By A. Rigal, J.-M. Azaïs, and A. Ribes in Climate Dynamics.

Estimation of the variability of mesoscale energy spectra with three years of COSMO-DE analyses. By T. Selz, L. Bierdel, and G.C. Craig in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.

ITCZ width controls on Hadley cell extent and eddy-driven jet position, and their response to warming. By O. Watt-Meyer and D.M.W. Frierson in the Journal of the Climate.

 

Discussion papers – open for comment:

Mechanism of ozone loss under enhanced water vapour conditions in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere in summer. By S. Robrecht et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

A numerical process study on the rapid transport of stratospheric air down to the surface over western North America and the Tibetan Plateau. By B. Škerlak et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Deadline approaching: CMIP6 Model Analysis Workshop – submit your abstract until 15 December

Abstract submission is now open for the

“CMIP6 Model Analysis Workshop”

25-28 March 2019,  Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona (Spain) 

Please go to  https://cmip6workshop19.sciencesconf.org/

The workshop is jointly organized by the WCRP Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) CMIP Panel and the European Commission Horizon 2020 projects PRIMAVERA (PRocess-based climate sIMulation: AdVances in high-resolution modelling and European climate Risk Assessment) and EUCP (EUropean Climate Prediction system).

Following the format of the WCRP CMIP5 model analysis workshop held in 2012, the workshop focus will be on:

  • Single and multi-model CMIP6 analyses and evaluation that takes advantage of the large suite of CMIP6 experiments
  • Efforts to connect model development and analysis to identify Earth system model improvements that help reduce systematic biases and/or increase the realism of models
  • Methods for multi-model analysis
  • Climate change impacts

The workshop will be structured around the three scientific questions:

  1. How does the Earth system respond to forcing?
  2. What are the origins and consequences of systematic model biases?
  3. How can we assess future climate change given climate variability, predictability and uncertainty in scenarios.

Workshop approach

 Short-presentation/poster format

The workshop will consist of a series of seven half-day sessions of three hours each. Each session will begin with 20-25 presenters given a 3 minute time slot to show no more than one slide summarizing the main conclusions of their poster. The rest of the half-day session will consist of viewing posters of that session. In addition, there will be an invited plenary talk each day.

Participation is limited by the size of the venue (~200 people) and format of the workshop.  Abstracts will be accepted based on relevance to the workshop focus.

 Timeline

  • Abstract submission opens:                              15 October 2018
  • Abstract submission deadline:                          15 December 2018
  • Abstract / Participation acceptance:                  15 January 2019

Hope to see you in Barcelona next year!

Best wishes,

Scientific Organizing Committee of the Workshop

Veronika Eyring, Greg Flato, Jean-Francois Lamarque, Jerry Meehl, Cath Senior, Ron Stouffer, and Karl Taylor (CMIP Panel)

Francisco J. Doblas-Reyes (EUCP)

Malcolm Roberts (PRIMAVERA)

WCRP strategic plan draft finalised

The draft WCRP Strategic Plan 2019-2028 has now been finalized by the WCRP Joint Scientific Committee (JSC) and is awaiting approval from the WCRP Co-sponsors: the World Meteorological Organization, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO and the International Science Council. Until this approval is obtained, the document remains in draft status. We thank everyone who provided suggestions and feedback on the draft WCRP Strategic Plan in the last year. To those of you who submitted comments as part of the public consultation, those comments (in anonymous form) and JSC responses to them are now available online: WCRP Strategic Plan public consultation responses.


Learn more at the Exhibition Booth 557 at the AGU:

Monday December 10 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tuesday December 11 10:00 AM – 5:30 PM
Wednesday December 12 10:00 AM – 5:30 PM
Thursday December 13 10:00 AM – 5:30 PM
Friday December 14 9:30 AM – 1:30 PM

See the map of AGU exhibition booths

The WCRP booth is located in the bottom row, five booths from the far left.

SPARC Science update: 4 December – 10 December

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

 

The Impact of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Tropical Variability on the Location, Frequency, and Duration of Cool-Season Extratropical Synoptic Events. By H.E. Attard and A.L. Lang in the Monthly Weather Review.

A new perspective toward cataloging Northern Hemisphere Rossby wave breaking on the dynamic tropopause. By K.A. Bowley, J.R. Gyakum, and E.H. Atallah in the Monthly Weather Review.

Exploiting the abrupt 4×CO2 scenario to elucidate tropical expansion mechanisms. By R. Chemke and L.M. Polvani in the Journal of the Climate.

The Circulation Response to Volcanic Eruptions: The Key Roles of Stratospheric Warming and Eddy Interactions. By K. DellaSanta, E.P. Gerber, and M. Toohey in the Journal of the Climate.

The Teleconnection of El Niño Southern Oscillation to the Stratosphere. By D.I.V. Domeisen, C.I. Garfinkel, and A.H. Butler in the Reviews of Geophysics.

Quantifying the variability of the annular modes: reanalysis uncertainty vs. sampling uncertainty. By E.P. Gerber and P. Martineau in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Combining data from the distributed GRUAN site Lauder–Invercargill, New Zealand, to provide a site atmospheric state best estimate of temperature. By J.S. Tradowsky et al. in Earth System Science Data.

The British-Baikal Corridor: A teleconnection pattern along the summertime polar front jet over Eurasia. By P. Xu, L. Wang, and W. Chen in the Journal of the Climate.

 

Discussion papers – open for comment:

Climate feedbacks in the Earth system and prospects for their evaluation. By C. Heinze et al. in Earth System Dynamics.

SPARC Science update: 27 November – 3 December

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

 
Stratospheric Connection to the Abrupt End of the 2016/2017 Iberian Drought. By B. Ayarzagüena et al. in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Intraseasonal responses of the East Asia summer rainfall to anthropogenic aerosol climate forcing. By G. Chen et al. in Climate Dynamics.

QBO influence on MJO amplitude over the Maritime Continent: Physical mechanisms and seasonality. By C.R. Densmore, E.R. Sanabia, and B.S. Barrett in the Monthly Weather Review.

The effect of a well-resolved stratosphere on East Asian winter climate. By K. Wei et al. in Climate Dynamics.

 

Discussion papers – open for comment:

Current rapid global temperature rise linked to falling SO2 emissions. By N.E.B. Cowern in Earth System Dynamics.

Seasonal characteristics of chemical and dynamical transports into the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. By Y. Inai et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

SPARC Science Update: 20 November – 26 November

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

 

Stratospheric Connection to the Abrupt End of the 2016/2017 Iberian Drought. By B. Ayarzagüena et al. in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Climate data empathy. By S. Brönnimann and J. Wintzer in WIREs Climate Change.

Response of Arctic ozone to sudden stratospheric warmings. By A. de la Cámara et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Reconstructing climatic modes of variability from proxy records: sensitivity to the methodological approach. By S. Michel et al. in Geoscientific Model Development.

Climate, weather, and water in history. By R.A. Morgan in WIREs Climate Change.

Global Climatologies of Fronts, Airmass Boundaries, and Airstream Boundaries: Why the Definition of “Front” Matters. By C.M. Thomas and D.M. Schultz in the Monthly Weather Review.

Polar amplification dominated by local forcing and feedbacks. By M.F. Stuecker et al. in Nature Climate Change.

The vertical wave number spectra of potential energy density in the stratosphere deduced from the COSMIC satellite observation. By Y.Y. Yan et al. in the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society.

Intermodel differences in upwelling in the tropical tropopause layer among CMIP5 models. By K. Yoshida, R. Mizuta, and O. Arakawa in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

 

Discussion papers – open for comment:

Convective hydration in the tropical tropopause layer during the StratoClim aircraft campaign: Pathway of an observed hydration patch. By K.-O. Lee et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

SPARC Science update: 13 November – 19 November

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

 

The Role of Hadley Circulation and Lapse-Rate Changes for the Future European Summer Climate. By R. Brogli et al. in the Journal of the Climate.

SO2 observations and sources in the western Pacific tropical tropopause region. By A.W. Rollins et al. in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Towards data‐driven weather and climate forecasting: Approximating a simple general circulation model with deep learning. By S. Scher in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Why does deep convection have different sensitivities to temperature perturbations in the lower and upper troposphere? By Y. Tian and Z. Kuang in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.

Initial report on polar mesospheric cloud observations by Himawari-8. By T.T. Tsuda et al. in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques.

 

Discussion papers – open for comment:

Correlated observation error models for assimilating all-sky infrared radiances. By A.J. Geer in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques.

SPARC SSG member Don Wuebbles receives 2018 Bert Bolin Global Environmental Change Award

We are thrilled to hear that Don Wuebbles has received this award which he thoroughly deserves. Don has contributed to SPARC science for many years and is currently a valuable member of the SPARC Steering Group.  – The SPARC co-chairs


From The AGU news:

Donald Wuebbles’s research contributions would be notable based solely on his foundational efforts in atmospheric chemistry, including important work on the ozone hole. But his research has been remarkably wide ranging and influential, advancing our knowledge about many key aspects of global environmental change, including severe weather, climate extremes, high-resolution modeling of the climate system, national security, and risk management issues associated with climate change. His leadership of environmental assessments has been extensive at the regional, national, and international levels. For the 2014 Third National Climate Assessment and the 2017 Climate Science Special Report, his singular leadership influence on the development of those products was one of the key reasons for the quality and balance of these influential assessments. His body of work reflects his deep commitment to solving the core environmental challenges of our age.

– Kenneth Kunkel, North Carolina State University, Raleigh

Find Don’s response on the AGU webpage:
https://eos.org/agu-news/wuebbles-receives-2018-bert-bolin-global-environmental-change-award

 

SPARC Science update: 6 November – 12 November

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

 

Data assimilation strategies for state dependent observation error variances. By C.H. Bishop in the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society.

Heterogeneity of scaling of the observed global temperature data. By S. Blesić, D. Zanchettin, and A. Rubino in the Journal of the Climate.

The role of the nonlinearity of the Stefan-Boltzmann law on the structure of radiatively forced temperature change. By M. Henry and T.M. Merlis in the Journal of the Climate.

Mean precipitation change from a deepening troposphere. By N. Jeevanjee and D.M. Romps in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

Characteristics of Atmospheric Wave‐Induced Laminae Observed by Ozonesondes at the Southern Tip of South America. By H. Ohyama et al. in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Inertia‐Gravity Waves Revealed in Radiosonde Data at Jang Bogo Station, Antarctica (74°37’S, 164°13’E). Part I: Characteristics, Energy, and Momentum Flux. By J.-H. Yoo et al. in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

 

Discussion papers – open for comment:

Unravelling the microphysics of polar mesospheric cloud formation. By D. Duft, M. nachbar, and T. Leisner in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Vacancy announcement: Coordinator for World Climate Research Programme at the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research

Position announcement from the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (BCCR):


The Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (BCCR) is currently seeking a senior adviser. The senior adviser will coordinate the newly established office for the World Climate Research Program (WCRP)’s regional activities and will report to the Programme’s Joint Scientific Committee. The office is shared between the Bjerknes Centre and the Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS) in Hamburg, where a corresponding position is being announced. Some travel may be expected.

Responsibilities:

  • Promote and coordinate WCRP’s Core projects and Grand Challenges in line with WCRP Strategic Plan 2019-2028
  • Contribute to synergy and integration between the various regional activities and WCRP’s Core Projects
  • Highlight opportunities, resources, and partnerships that can help promote regional climate research within the WCRP
  • Contribute to the dissemination of WCRP´s activities through brochures and online media
  • Schedule and organize science-specific meetings and courses conducted by WCRP
  • Report on plans and progress at annual meetings
  • Contribute to synergy and integration between WCRP and BCCR

Qualifications and personal qualities:

  • A doctoral degree within the natural sciences related to climate
  • Extensive documented experience in working internationally
  • Documented experience from strategy work and coordination
  • Documented experience from organizing meetings and conferences
  • Fluent in spoken and written English
  • Good communication skills in Norwegian is an advantage
  • Ability to cooperate and other qualities required for the position will be emphasized

We can offer:

  • A good and professionally challenging working environment
  • Salary at pay grade 64 – 70 (code 1364) in the state salary scale. This currently amounts to an annual salary of 565 100 – 631 300 before taxes. Higher salary can be considered for a particularly qualified applicant.
  • Enrolment in the Norwegian Public Service Pension Fund
  • A position in an inclusive workplace (IA enterprise)
  • Good welfare benefits

Detailed information about the position can be obtained by contacting:

Director Tore Furevik, Bjerknes Centre of Climate Research, on.bi1545175913u.ifg1545175913@erot1545175913 / +47 98677226

The state labour force shall reflect the diversity of Norwegian society to the greatest extent possible. Age and gender balance among employees is therefore a goal. People with immigrant backgrounds and people with disabilities are encouraged to apply for the position. Information about applicants may be made public even if the applicant has asked not to be named on the list of persons who have applied. The applicant must be notified if the request to be omitted is not met. For further information about the recruitment process, click here.