All posts by Winfried Beer

SPARC Science Update: 17–23 November 2017

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).


The link between eddy-driven jet variability and weather regimes in the North Atlantic-European sector.
By E. Madonna et al in the Quaterly Journal of the Royal meteorological Society.

A New Paradigm for Diagnosing Contributions to Model Aerosol Forcing Error. By A.L. Jones et al. in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Improved Winter European Atmospheric Blocking Frequencies in High-Resolution Global Climate Simulations. By P. Davini et al. in the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems.

Prominent mid-latitude circulation signature in High Asia’s surface climate during monsoon. By T. Mölg et al. in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Differential Radiative Heating Drives Tropical Atmospheric Circulation Weakening. By Y. Xia and Y. Huang in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Bifurcation of potential vorticity gradients across the Southern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex. By J. Conway, et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions.

Role of the North Atlantic Oscillation in decadal temperature trends. By C. Iles and G. Hegerl in the Environmental Research Letters.

A Census of Atmospheric Variability From Seconds to Decades. By P.D. Williams et al. in the Geophysical Research Letters.

NCSE offers webinar on COP-23 outcomes

On 30 November 2017, 1:15-2:45 PM Eastern Time, the non-profit organisation National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) is holding a webinar on Climate Science, Impacts, and Policy Today: the 4th National Climate Assessment and Outcomes from the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Bonn, COP-23.

View the programme and register at www.NCSEGlobal.org.

SPARC Science Update: 11-16 November

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

Equatorward dispersion of a high-latitude volcanic plume and its relation to the Asian summer monsoon: a case study of the Sarychev eruption in 2009. By X. Wu et al in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Maintaining Momentum in Climate Model Development. Comment by C.C. Ummenhofer et al. in Earth & Space Science News.

How predictable are the Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillations? Exploring the Variability and Predictability of the Northern Hemisphere. By D. Domeisen et al in the Journal of Climate.

Impacts of Horizontal Propagation of Orographic Gravity Waves on the Wave Drag in the Stratosphere and Lower Mesosphere. By X. Xu et al in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Origin of the 2016 QBO Disruption and Its Relationship to Extreme El Niño Events. By C.A. Barton and J.P. McCormack in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Relationships Between Gravity Waves Observed at Earth’s Surface and in the Stratosphere Over the Central and Eastern United States. By C.D. de Groot-Hedlin et al in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Onset of Stratospheric Ozone Recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole in Assimilated Daily Total Ozone Columns. By A.T.J. Laat et al in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

SPARC Science Update: 01-10 November

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

Special Issue “Global data systems for the study of solar-terrestrial variability”. By T. Watanabe et al. in Earth Planets and Space.

Impacts of Mt Pinatubo volcanic aerosol on the tropical stratosphere in chemistry–climate model simulations using CCMI and CMIP6 stratospheric aerosol data. By L.E. Revell et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Radiative and chemical response to interactive stratospheric sulfate aerosols in fully coupled CESM1(WACCM). By M.J.Mills et al. in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

How Will Climate Change Affect the United States in Decades to Come? By D. Wuebbles et al. in Earth & Space Science News.

Systematic Errors in Weather and Climate Models: Nature, Origins, and Way Forward. By A. Zadra et al. in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

Does Strong Tropospheric Forcing Cause Large-Amplitude Mesospheric Gravity Waves? A DEEPWAVE Case Study. By M. Bramberger et al. in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Significant Contributions of Volcanic Aerosols to Decadal Changes in the Stratospheric Circulation. By M. Diallo et al. in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Formaldehyde in the Tropical Western Pacific: Chemical Sources and Sinks, Convective Transport, and Representation in CAM-Chem and the CCMI Models. By D.C. Anderson in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Abstract submission closing soon: 2nd Pan-GASS Meeting on Understanding and Modeling Atmospheric Processes

The 2nd Pan-GASS meeting on Understanding and Modelling Atmospheric Processes will take place on 26 February – 2 March 2018 in Lorne, near Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The Global Atmospheric System Studies (GASS) panel supports the international community that carries out and uses observations, process studies, and numerical model experiments with the goal of developing and improving the representation of atmospheric processes in weather and climate models.

Abstract submission closes on 31 October 2017.

Find more information.

Special Issue accepting articles on tropics-midlatitude interactions and teleconnections

The Canadian Journal Atmosphere-Ocean is calling for submissions for a Special Issue dedicated to the International Project “The Year of Tropics-Midlatitude Interactions and Teleconnections”.

The Special Issue is a collection of manuscripts documenting observational and modeling studies focused on understanding the physical mechanisms underlying the two-way interactions between tropics and mildlatitudes on the subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) time scales; prediction and predictability studies using the S2S database, and the role of intra-seasonal teleconnections in the occurrence and frequency of high-impact weather events.

Manuscript submissions are being accepted through May 2018. For submission instructions, please visit http://cmos.ca/site/ao. The special issue can be selected from the drop-down list of the submission process. If you plan to submit a manuscript, please send a tentative title to Cristiana Stan, ude.u1621048124mg@na1621048124tsc1621048124, by 31 January 2018.

Survey to guide the development of the WCRP Strategic Plan 2019-2029

As part of the development of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Strategic Plan, the WCRP Joint Scientific Committee (JSC) invites you to participate in a "Survey to guide the development of the WCRP Strategic Plan 2019-2029" which includes a SWOT analysis of WCRP and short questions on core business, main new research emphases and emerging topics to be addressed in the next 10 years.

The survey is very short, but if you want to consider your responses before submitting them, a full transcript of the questions is also given below.

The JSC will take your comments into consideration when they draft the new WCRP Strategic Plan. This survey is part of a series of consultation phases planned over the coming months seeking inputs from WCRP stakeholders. While this survey is principally for the immediate WCRP community, consultations with a broader group of stakeholders (e.g. WCRP sponsors, WCRP entities, partners programmes, agencies, early career scientists networks, community at large, etc.) are also planned once the JSC has produced a first draft of the strategic plan.
Thank you for your time and input into this important document.

The survey was prepared by the WCRP Secretariat on behalf of
Guy Brasseur (JSC Chair) and the WCRP Joint Scientific Committee

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Full transcript of questions: Survey to guide the development of the WCRP Strategic Plan 2019-2029

1. SWOT analysis: SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis is used to identify an organization’s internal strengths and weaknesses, as well as its external opportunities and threats (see image below). We invite you to comment on each of these areas in the form below, including any suggested actions for improvement.

  • Strengths
  • Weaknesses
  • Opportunities
  • Threats

2. Core Business: The survey will also help Identifying and possibly reviewing the core business of the programme in this context. We invite you to comment on the current fundamental work of WCRP, its alignment with and relevance to our mission (see https://www.wcrp-climate.org/about-wcrp/wcrp-overview) and any need for adjustment. What is and should be the core business of WCRP?

3. High Level Science Questions: The current overarching objectives of the programme are (see https://www.wcrp-climate.org/about-wcrp/wcrp-overview):

to determine the predictability of climate; and
to determine the effect of human activities on climate

The evolving climate policy and climate service landscape suggests a new emphasis under those objectives for the next 10 years. We invite you to provide suggestions for two specific "High level" research questions the programme should focus on, in light of those overarching objectives and recent science accomplishments. What would you propose as the two main High Level science questions to be addressed for the next 10 years?

4. Emerging topics: The survey welcomes suggestions for any ’emerging/hot topics’ which you feel should be addressed because of their importance, relevance, ambition and urgency. This box can also be used for any free comments. Are there any ’emerging science topics’ which you feel should be addressed because of their importance, relevance, ambition and urgency?

SPARC Science Update: 23-29 September

A selection of new science articles from the past week of interest to the SPARC community (a SPARC Office choice).

More-Persistent Weak Stratospheric Polar Vortex States Linked to Cold Extremes. By M. Kretschmer et al. in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

Modeling Seasonal Sudden Stratospheric Warming Climatology Based on Polar Vortex Statistics. By M.F. Horan and T. Reichler in the Journal of Climate.

Seasonal sensitivity of the Northern Hemisphere jet-streams to Arctic temperatures on subseasonal timescales. By E.A. Barnes and I.R. Simpson in the Journal of Climate.

Development of a Polar Stratospheric Cloud Model within the Community Earth System Model: Assessment of 2010 Antarctic Winter. By Y. Zhu et al. in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Brominated VSLS and their influence on ozone under a changing climate. By S. Falk et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Ozone comparison between Pandora #34, Dobson #061, OMI, and OMPS in Boulder, Colorado, for the period December 2013–December 2016. By J. Herman et al. in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques.

An “island” in the stratosphere – on the enhanced annual variation of water vapour in the middle and upper stratosphere in the southern tropics and subtropics. By S. Lossow et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Reanalysis comparisons of upper tropospheric–lower stratospheric jets and multiple tropopauses. By G.L. Manney et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Snow-(N)AO teleconnection and its modulation by the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation. By Y. Peings et al. in the Journal of Climate.

Common Warming Pattern Emerges Irrespective of Forcing Location. By S.M. Kang et al. in the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems.

Potential impact of carbonaceous aerosol on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) and precipitation during Asian summer monsoon in a global model simulation. By S. Fadnavis et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Discussion papers – open for comment

Harmonisation and trends of 20-years tropical tropospheric ozone data. By E. Leventidou et al. in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions.